The New York Times

The New York Times is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. It was founded in 1851, by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones, and was initially published by Raymond, Jones & Company.



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This P.G.A. Champion Lost the Wanamaker Trophy. Oops.

It’s nearly impossible to talk about the P.G.A. Championship‘s Wanamaker Trophy without mentioning how the five-time champion Walter Hagen lost it in Chicago after winning the event in 1925. As the story goes, while out in Chicago celebrating the win, Hagen gave his taxi driver $5 and asked him to take the cumbersome trophy to his hotel. It not only never arrived, but Hagen never admitted the loss to the P.G.A. until he lost the championship in 1928 and had to turn the trophy over to the winner.
By John Clarke
• The New York Times

Wildfires Burn More Than 150,000 Acres in Three States

McKenna Thompson, 30, was not too worried when she learned last week that she was among thousands of people across Arizona, Nebraska and New Mexico who would be forced to leave as wildfires approached. She had been driving back home to Flagstaff, Ariz., when she heard about the evacuation order. As smoke swirled around her car and the skies darkened, she soon felt as if she were “looking at hell,” she said on Sunday. She picked up her 2-year-old son and her mother and drove to a cafe to wait ou
By Farah Eltohamy
• The New York Times

Genarlow Wilson

Georgia Supreme Court declines to hear appeal of Genarlow Wilson, who was convicted of child molestation for having consensual oral sex with 15-year-old girl when he was 17; he was sentenced to 10 years in prison without possibility of parole and has served two years; is fighting to get conviction moderated so he will not have to register as sex offender; case moved State Legislature to change law in March to ensure that most sex between teenagers be treated as misdemeanor, but it could not make
By Genarlow Wilson
• The New York Times

What Will the Highways of the Future Look Like?

The Romans built 50,000 miles of them. Today, there's at least 500 times that number worldwide. They convey goods and people over vast distances at speed, allowing societies to bloom and economies to thrive. Highways were a cornerstone of the ancient world — and in the 21st century, they’re no less important.
By Alasdair Lane
• The New York Times

Michael Spies Has Become Sailing’s Guru of Speed

Before Sunday’s race, Michael Spies of Australia had sailed the Sydney Hobart Yacht Race 43 times. In 1999, he won after breaking the race record by half a day. In 2003, Spies won again. He also has helped fellow sailors find the right boats and refit them into superior racing yachts. His latest effort is the Maritimo, a 54-foot racing yacht he found in the United States for Bill Barry-Cotter, a former motorboat racing champion who also races sailboats.
By John Clarke
• The New York Times

At Amazon Site, Tornado Collided With Company’s Peak Delivery Season

Nearly every day as Christmas nears, Amazon’s share of online sales typically rises, as customers turn to the e-commerce giant to quickly deliver packages. To make that happen, Amazon hires hundreds of thousands of additional workers, both full-time employees and contractors, and runs its operations at full tilt. One of them, Alonzo Harris, drove his cargo van into Amazon’s delivery depot in Edwardsville, Ill., after 8 p.m. on Friday after a full day delivering packages north of St. Louis. Suddenly, an alarm blared on his work phone. Someone yelled that this was not a drill. Mr. Harris, 44, ran into a shelter on Amazon’s site and heard a loud roar. “I felt like the floor was coming off the ground,” he said. “I felt the wind blowing and saw debris flying everywhere, and people started screaming and hollering and the lights went out.”
By Eric Berger
• The New York Times

You’re Allowed to Complain About Your Kids, Even After Infertility

I clamped my hands over my ears as the obstetrician cranked up the volume on the ultrasound machine. After three pregnancy losses, I was convinced that we’d be met only with static. “I think you’re going to want to hear this,” the doctor said. And there was the unmistakable drumming of my son’s heart. At that moment, I promised myself that I would always be grateful for this baby, and for my body that found a way to grow with him. And yet, when it’s 4:58 a.m. and I’m awakened by him bellowing for potato chips and cartoons, parenting can feel tedious, lonely and exhausting.
By Danna Lorch
• The New York Times

How Crypto is Re‑Writing the Rules of Digital Ownership

Shortly after the financial crisis of 2008, a group of tech-minded trailblazers sought a solution to the shortcomings of conventional finance. They envisaged a world underpinned not by centralized power, but by a distributed, democratic system of ownership that was inclusive, transparent and secure. This world, the crypto world, grew steadily in the years that followed. Then the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Global lockdowns have hastened the advance of all things digital and, in this uncertain age of
By Alasdair Lane
• The New York Times

A 6-Hour Opera in a Pandemic? The Met Goes for It.

6:18 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 26, opening night of Wagner’s “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” at the Metropolitan Opera: Not long after the opera begins, the tenor Paul Appleby prepares to go on as Yasmine Kiss, a stage manager, keeps track of the score.Credit...Todd Heisler/The New York Times As some try to lure audiences back with short programs, the Metropolitan Opera is staging its longest work: Wagner’s “Die Meistersinger.” A 6-Hour Opera in a Pandemic? The Met Goes for It. 6:18 p.m. on Tues
By BlackOre Music
• The New York Times

A Babysitter and a Band-Aid Wrapper: Inside the Submarine Spy Case

WASHINGTON — On July 28, Diana Toebbe posted a Facebook message looking for a babysitter to take care of her children early on the coming Saturday morning for five to six hours. Later the post, visible only to friends, was updated with the word “*FOUND*.” And on that Saturday, Ms. Toebbe accompanied her husband, Jonathan, to south-central Pennsylvania. Unbeknown to Ms. Toebbe, she and her husband were being watched by the F.B.I.
By
• The New York Times

U.S. Navy Engineer Charged in Attempt to Sell Nuclear Submarine Secrets

WASHINGTON — A nuclear engineer for the U.S. Navy and his wife have been charged with trying to share some of the United States’ most closely held secrets on submarine technology with another country, according to court documents unsealed on Sunday.
By
• The New York Times

A Sailing Season Full of Drama

When Larry Ellison, the founder of Oracle, and the five-time America’s Cup winner Russell Coutts started SailGP in 2018, they wanted to bring the excitement of Formula 1 to sailing. So far this year, the series has had crashes, Black Flags and broken bones. “You’ve got the best sailors in the world on these boats, and they’re not easy boats to sail,” said Phil Robertson, the driver for Spain’s team. “It’s very high tech — more of a machine than a yacht. But it’s one of the coolest things to happen to yacht racing.”
By John Clarke
• The New York Times